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‘Rim Fire’ in northern California continues to burn, threatens local reservoir

Business continuity consultants can help communities better prepare for the possibility of wildfires.
Business continuity consultants can help communities better prepare for the possibility of wildfires.

California continues to experience arid, warm weather conditions that could impact wildfires. The latest blaze is going to be the 13th largest in state history, according to CNN.

For nine days, a wildfire near Yosemite National Park has had the potential to reach the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, which accounts for 80 percent of San Francisco's water, reported ABC News. Despite warm and dry conditions, local firefighters are confident that their waterways will not be contaminated with ash.

"We're taking advantage that the water we're receiving is still of good quality," Harlan Kelly, general manager of the city's Public Utilities Commission told USA Today. "We're bringing down as much water as possible and replenishing all of the local reservoirs."

In case anything goes wrong, Kelly reassured San Francisco residents that they have enough water to sustain operations for at least six months.

Since Monday morning, the "Rim Fire" destroyed 23 structures including the Berkeley Tuolumne Family Camp within its 150,000-acre span, according to NBC News. The camp has been a part of the Bay Area since 1922. Local firefighters battling the flames are hoping that they can control the blaze before it reaches Yosemite National Park.

Emergency personnel are doing all they can to prepare for the worst by spraying flame retardant along mountains and dampening sequoia trees with water. The sequoia grove is a popular attraction within the park because the plant species is one of the oldest plants on earth.

Because of the the 3,700 firefighters' strategies, they were able to contain the fire by 20 percent as of Monday. On Sunday, officials only reported that 7 percent of it was controlled. 

Business continuity consultants who specialize in designing tabletop exercises can help residents establish safe escape routes while also ensuring that emergency staff properly understand their roles.