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Heavy rain and burn scars led to more flooding in Colorado

Parts of Colorado experienced another round of flash floods from heavy rainfall Thursday morning.
Parts of Colorado experienced another round of flash floods from heavy rainfall Thursday morning.

Due to recent wildfires and floods in the Colorado Springs area, local authorities and residents should have a continuity of operations plan to protect themselves from weather-related dangers. Colorado was hit with another round of flash floods this past Wednesday night to early Thursday morning, overwhelming local streams and causing rock and mudslides, according to the Huffington Post. As of this afternoon, three people have died from the storm's path.

"This is not your ordinary day, this is not your ordinary disaster," Boulder County Sheriff Joe Pelle said during a news conference on Thursday morning. "All the preparation in the world can't put people up those canyons while those walls of water and debris are coming down."

The storm cell that was passing through Colorado overnight made impact along all parts of the Colorado Front Range, housing about 82 percent of the state's residents. The National Weather Service (NWS) warned those in the area to get to higher ground. Within 24 hours, Boulder reported six-and-a-half inches of rain, NBC News reported.

Over in Jamestown, the NWS issued a mandatory evacuation a little after midnight, when some structures in town were already impacted from the heavy rainfall. One of the three individuals died from the impact of a collapsed home.

Dams and culverts around the Boulder area gave out, causing additional water to flow in the streets, making it difficult for anyone to drive under these conditions. Three people in Broomfield, along U.S. Highway 287, experienced some injuries from the water's impact.

At one point, Larimer County officials had to call the National Guard for assistance to relocate some residents. A local road was washed away during the storm so nearby residents were unable to leave the area. The University of Colorado in Boulder canceled classes. 

Thursday's storm is the second time the Colorado Springs-Boulder area experienced a storm causing significant damage within a month.

Business continuity consultants can help areas create a plan that will protect themselves from similar events in the future.