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Uber accidentally exposes the personal data of some of its drivers

Uber leaks the information of almost 700 drivers.
Uber leaks the information of almost 700 drivers.

On-demand, transportation giant Uber needs to review the cyber security portion of its disaster recovery plan. 

According to The Verge, the company accidently released the personal data of 674 of its  drivers last week. The specific information released is fairly extensive, including pictures of their licenses, vehicle registration numbers, Social Security Numbers and other vital information.

"We were notified about a bug impacting a fraction of our US drivers earlier this afternoon," Uber said in a statement on Oct. 14. "Within 30 minutes our security team had fixed the issue."

While it is still uncertain if the leaked information was collected by anyone with criminal intentions, many drivers are not pleased about the security debacle they now find themselves in. 

"This info is worse than credit card information," one Uber driver forum user wrote. "This info can be used to create accounts and verify identities online."

Uber launched in 2009 as a on-demand company that allows users to use their mobile application to hail and pay for a ride with an Uber driver, much like a taxi. Drivers use their own cars and smartphone to find riders and get directions to their destination. The limited overhead for Uber and the easy to use nature of the service for riders has helped the company grow tremendously in the intervening years. The company now operates in 58 countries and 300 cities worldwide and is worth around $50 billion

The Verge reports that the leak involved Uber's new Uber Partner application, which is designed to give drivers more information. 

This is not the first incident of lax cyber security for the company. Earlier in the year, an Uber database of some 50,000 drivers was accessible for anyone using the programing repository software GitHub. 

Cyber security isn't just for international, billion-dollar companies. Companies that have yet to develop their own disaster recovery strategy can partner with a business continuity consultant that has extensive experience with these issues.